Girl Scouts can do it all!

Bakersfield Girl Scout Troop made a video to tell their story to their peers.

Troop 2718 from Bakersfield let their creative sides out when they made a video about Girl Scouts! Ande, Ryan, Shaina, Sierra and Vanessa from Girl Scout Cadette Troop 2718 thought up the theme, drafted the script, and starred in the short video. The video was part of their MEdia Cadette Journey,* where the girls learn how they can use their own stories to shape media—for themselves, their community and the world.

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The idea behind the video was to show other girls their age that you can be in sports, acting, and other activities while also being a Girl Scout.  Troop leader Julie Moore stated, “They came up with idea because as they have become older in Girl Scouts, a lot of their friends and peers think that Girl Scouts are nerdy.  As we talked about the perceptions of girls in the media and how they feel about them, they decided they wanted to address the perceptions about Girl Scouts and show they can be cool, normal girls in the community.”

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The Troop started working on the project last August, and filmed when they could.  Richie Velasquez, Digital Media Director, at Woodward West/Woodward U donated his time to help with the filming and editing.

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“When I saw the video they put together it brought me to tears. What an amazing message these girls told in the video. They showed other girls that you can do it all while being a Girl Scout. We couldn’t be more proud of Troop 2718. They truly embody what Girl Scouting is all about,” stated Girl Scouts of Central California South CEO Cathy Ferguson.

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Troop 2718 is very active not only in Girl Scouts but also outside of Girl Scouting. Girls from the Troop are involved in their school student body councils, four girls have straight A’s, they are in sports, and two sets of girls in Troop 2718 are working towards their Girl Scout Silver Award. Going for this Award—the highest award a Girl Scout Cadette can earn—gives each girl a chance to show that she is are a leader who is organized, determined, and dedicated to improving her community.

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Girl Scouting builds girls of courage, confidence and character who make the world a better place. Girl Scouts of Central California South is the premier girl organization that produces quality leaders who ensure hope for the future. The goal of Girl Scouting is to assist girls in developing leadership skills by helping them Discover, Connect and Take Action in their communities. Membership registration for the 2012-2013 year is currently underway. If you are interested in getting involved with Girl Scouts of Central California South please click here.

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*  On every Leadership Journey, everything girls do—whether it’s performing science experiments, creating art projects, cooking simple meals, or learning to protect the planet’s water supply—is aimed at giving them the benefits of the Girl Scout “Keys to Leadership”: Discover, Connect, Take Action.

Presidential Medal of Freedom Awarded to the Founder of Girl Scouts

Press Release

Presidential Medal of Freedom Awarded to the Founder of Girl Scouts,

Juliette Gordon Low

May 29, 2012 Fresno, CA ­­ — The White House announced today that President Obama is posthumously awarding the Presidential Medal of Freedom to the founder of Girl Scouts, Juliette Gordon Low. The Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian award in the United States, recognizes individuals who have made “an especially meritorious contribution to the security or national interests of the United States, world peace, cultural or other significant public or private endeavors.”

 

“Juliette Gordon Low was a visionary, whose legacy lives on in the 59 million American women who have participated in Girl Scouting at some point in their lives,” said Girl Scouts of Central California South, CEO, Cathy Ferguson. “She believed that all girls should be given the opportunity to develop physically, mentally, and spiritually, and in founding Girl Scouts in 1912, she made an indelible and enduring contribution to the lives of girls and to our nation. It is so fitting that during our 100th anniversary year, Juliette should be honored with the Presidential Medal of Freedom.”

 

From the beginning, Girl Scouts has insisted on being a voice for all girls. Juliette Gordon Low’s first 18 Girl Scouts included girls from influential Savannah families, and girls from the Female Orphan Asylum and Congregation Mickve Israel. As early as 1917, the first African American troops were established, as well as troops for disabled girls. One of the earliest Latina troops was formed in 1922, Girl Scout troops supported Japanese American girls in internment camps in the 1940s, and by the 1950s, Girl Scouts was leading the charge to fully integrate all of its troops. In 1956, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. called Girl Scouts “a force for desegregation.”

 

Low’s exemplary life, work, and legacy have received many forms of recognition in the past. In 1948, President Harry S. Truman signed a bill authorizing a stamp in honor of Low. On October 28, 1979, Low was inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame, and on December 2, 1983, President Ronald Reagan signed a bill naming a new federal building in Savannah in honor of her—the second federal building in history to be named after a woman. Additionally, a bust of Low is displayed in the state capitol of Georgia.

 

In receiving the Presidential Medal of Freedom, Low joins the ranks of Frances Hesselbein, who in 1998 was awarded the medal for her work with Girl Scouts of the USA. Hesselbein served as Girl Scout CEO and is credited with increasing minority membership and establishing the Daisy Scout program for the youngest girls accepted into Girl Scouts.